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Accepted Tutorials

[T1] Taming Large Models using Hawk and NeoEMF

Speakers: Antonio Garcia-Dominguez, Dimitris Kolovos, Konstantinos Barmpis, Gwendal Daniel and Gerson Sunyé

Abstract

Industrial models can quickly reach a complexity and size that makes storing them entirely in single files prohibitive. These larger models are typically either broken up into smaller files, or stored in a database. Using smaller files is simpler, but running a global query can still require loading all the files and therefore run into the same scalability issues. As for databases, most people go directly for well-known relational databases. However, a relational database is not the only answer for scalability: we can use NoSQL databases to solve the issues with queries over fragmented models, or replace relational model stores altogether. In this tutorial, we will discuss two approaches for achieving scalable model persistence and querying through our Hawk and NeoEMF open-source tools. Hawk’s approach is to use a NoSQL database as an efficient index to the models, focusing on improving query speed while keeping your existing persistence as is. NeoEMF allows for persisting models in a NoSQL database, which can speed up loading and writing of the models as well. The presenters are the original developers of the tools, which have seen industrial adoption through the MONDO EU FP7 and ITEA3 MEASURE projects.

Length: half day

Biography

Antonio Garcia-Dominguez is Lecturer in Computer Science in the School of Engineering and Applied Science at Aston University. Antonio’s current research focuses on sca able model-driven engineering, specifically high-performance querying through the development of the Hawk model indexing framework. Antonio has driven the adoption of Hawk in several European companies over the MONDO EU FP7 and ITEA3 MEASURE projects.

Dimitris Kolovos is a Professor of Software Engineering in the Department of Computer Science at the University of York, where he researches automated and model-based software engineering. He leads the open-source Epsilon model-based software engineering platform, and led the MONDO EU FP7 work package that produced the Hawk tool. Dimitris has co-authored more than 150 peer-reviewed papers and has co-organised several workshops (including BigMDE at STAF and COMMitMDE at MODELS).

Konstantinos Barmpis is a Research Associate in the Department of Computer Science at the University of York, currently focusing on repository mining, distributed systems and domain-specific languages. He has produced the core components of the Hawk tool as part of the MONDO EU FP7 project and continues to support its development.

Gerson Sunyé is an Associate Professor of Software Engineering in the Department of Computer Science at the University of Nantes, where he researches software testing and model-based software engineering. He leads the Atlanmod open-source modelling platform and is the initiator of the NeoEMF tool. Gerson has co-authored more than 60 peer-reviewed papers.

Gwendal Daniel is a post-doctoral fellow in the SOM Research Lab at Internet Interdisciplinary Institute (IN3), a research centre of the Universitat Oberta de Catalunya (UOC). His research interests include model persistence, query, and transformation techniques, as well as NoSQL data modelling. Gwendal is one of the core committers of the NeoEMF project, and the main contributor of the Mogwaï query framework.


[T2] Making Modeling Cool Again: Teaching and Researching Model-Driven Engineering using Animation, 3D Simulation and the Internet of Things

Speakers: Juergen Dingel, Karim Jahed and Ernesto Posse

Abstract

The tutorial will provide a short overview of modeldriven software development (MDSD) with UML-RT and Papyrus-RT. UML-RT is a proven UML profile for real-time embedded software supported by several tools including IBM RSA-RTE, eTrice, and Papyrus-RT, an open-source MDSD tool. Moreover, the tutorial will show how Unity3D, a popular development tool for three-dimensional video games, can be used to animate the executions of code generated from models, and to define and implement simulation scenarios that the generated code interacts with. Finally, the tutorial will illustrate how generated code can leveraged for the development of Internet of Things (IoT) applications created with development tools such as Node-RED. In each case, a key ingredient is a suitable communication mechanism that connects the generated code with external and separately developed software in a suitable fashion. A central goal of the tutorial is to demonstrate how model-driven software development (MDSD) with open source tooling can be used in concert with software from other technical domains and how this joint use can be mutually beneficial by addressing problems in either MDE or the other domain.

Length: half day

Biography

Juergen Dingel is professor in the School of Computing at Queen’s University. He received a Ph.D. in Computer Science in 1999 from Carnegie Mellon University. He was PC Co-chair of the FMOODS-FORTE and MODELS con- ferences in 2011 and 2014, respectively. He is on the editorial board of the Springer journal Software and Systems Modeling (SoSyM), and currently serves as chair of the MODELS Steering Committee. Juergen’s research interests include software modelling, model-driven engineering, formal methods, and software quality assurance. He has collaborated with a range of industrial partners on these topics including IBM, General Motors, and Ericsson.

Karim Jahed is PhD student in the School of Computing at Queen’s University. He received his M.Sc. degree in Computer Science from the Lebanese American University. His current research focus is the model-driven development of distributed systems for IoT applications.

Ernesto Posse is a senior software developer at Zeligsoft (2009) Ltd. in Gatineau, Quebec, Canada, working on the development modelling tools with focus on code generation and mixed textual/graphical modelling. Before Zeligsoft he was a Post-Doctoral Fellow at the School of Computing in Queen’s University (Canada). He holds Ph.D. and M.Sc. degrees in Computer Science from McGill University (Canada). He has long-standing research interests in the design, implementation and semantics of programming and modelling languages, as well as formal methods, specially process algebras, temporal logics and model checking.


[T3] Develop your Own Car

Speakers: Levi Lucio, Sebastian Voss, Tatiana Chuprina, Andreas Bayha, Johannes Eder and Sudeep Kanav

Abstract

AUTOFOCUS3 (AF3) is a mature model-driven engineering environment to develop software for embedded systems. For the past 20 years,several versions of AF3 have served as a platform for experimenting with cutting-edge research ideas in Model-Driven Development. AF3 is a tool that fully encompasses the software life cycle, from requirements, to architecture, simulation, deployment, code generation and verification. The attendees of this tutorial will be given the unique opportunity to model and deploy software on a real remote-controlled vehicle, using only AF3. Attendees will start by modeling the software controller for a blinker, which will be integrated with the model of the vehicle’s software. The generated code will then be flashed onto a Raspberry Pi contained in the physical remote-controlled model vehicle which can then be driven in the real world. Attendees who finish early will be able to model more advanced driving assistance functionalities. The last part of the tutorial will be dedicated to deepening the attendees’ understanding of the modeling capabilities of AF3 in areas such as requirements engineering, design-space exploration, building safety cases, formal verification, modeling processes, testing or variability modeling.

Length: full day

Biography

Levi Lúcio is a senior scientist and project manager at fortiss GmbH in Munich, Germany. He was awarded a PhD from the University of Geneva, Switzerland, in 2008, for his work on Model-Based Testing. At fortiss he works with aerospace and automotive companies to develop novel tools that include model-based software engineering and domain specificity at their core. After completing his PhD, Levi worked extensively in the area of model transformations, having proposed techniques for model transformation specification, execution and verification, as well as surveys in the domain. He has been part of the organizing committee of 10+ workshops, many of them co-located with MODELS. Levi’s current research interests are domain-specific modeling, usability in formal methods and, more recently, how machine learning can help in modeling software and in software engineering in general.

Sebastian Voss has done his PhD in the avionic context at EADS Innovation Works in the Sensors, Electronics and Systems Integration department. At fortiss he is heading the Model-based Systems Engineering department and the research group Design Space Exploration, for finding optimized system configurations. His research interests include techniques and tools for the professional development of software-intensive systems, efficient design space exploration methods and their model-based (tool) development in A UTO FOCUS3.

Tatiana Chuprina started at fortiss as a Master student with a study of experimental comparison between A UTO FOCUS3 and Papyrus-RT. After her successful graduation from the Frankfurt University of Applied Science in 2016, she has been developing her work as a computer scientist at the Model-based System Engineering competence field at fortiss. She is currently at the beginning of her doctoral research having as main topic requirements engineering. Before moving to fortiss, Tatiana acquired practical knowledge working for a telecommunications company as systems integrator.

Andreas Bayha received his MSc in 2014 from the Technical University Munich. Since then he works as a researcher in the model-based systems engineering division of fortiss. His research interests are methodological aspects and tooling solutions for model-based product line engineering. In this context he was involved in the automotive, avionics and industrial automation domains.

Johannes Eder received his Master of Science from Technical University of Munich in 2015 in computer science. Since 2015 he has worked as a research associate and PhD candidate at fortiss. His research interests include model-based development of embedded systems, design space exploration, as well as their tooling support.

Sudeep Kanav studied computer science (MSc) at the Technical University Munich with a focus on theorem proving. Since 2016 he is a research associate at fortiss in the “Model Based Systems Engineering” competence field. His research interests are formal verification, model based system development, and model to model transformations. He is the main developer and responsible for the formal verification feature of AutoFOCUS3.


[T4] DEVS Modelling and Simulation

Speakers: Yentl Van Tendeloo and Hans Vangheluwe

Abstract

DEVS is a popular formalism for modelling the structure and dynamics of complex systems using a discrete-event abstraction. At this abstraction level, a timed sequence of pertinent “events” input to a system (or internal to the system, in the case of timeouts) cause instantaneous changes to the state of the system. The syntax and semantics of DEVS are precisely defined, and support modular composition. DEVS allows for performance analysis, realtime execution, and interoperation with real-world systems. DEVS may serve as a “simulation assembly language” to which other discrete-event simulation languages such as Statecharts, Timed Automata and Cellular Automata can be mapped, preserving behaviour traces. DEVS’ modular composition allows models in these different formalisms to be meaningfully coupled, after their translation to DEVS. DEVS has also been used as a hierarchical framework for co-simulation or orchestration of discrete-event simulators. This tutorial introduces the Classic DEVS formalism in a bottom-up fashion, using a simple traffic light example. The syntax and operational semantics of Atomic (behavioural) models are introduced first, followed by Coupled (structural) models. Applications of DEVS are introduced by an example in performance analysis of queueing systems. The tutorial uses the tool PythonPDEVS, though this introduction is equally applicable to other DEVS tools.

Length: half day

Biography

Yentl Van Tendeloo is a PhD student at the University of Antwerp (Belgium). He is a member of the Modelling, Simulation and Design (MSDL) research lab. In his Master’s thesis, he worked on MDSL’s PythonPDEVS simulator, a parallel and distributed simulator for Classic DEVS, Parallel DEVS, and Dynamic Structure DEVS with support for computational resource usage models. The topic of his PhD is the conceptualization and development of a new meta-modelling framework and model management system called the Modelverse.

Hans Vangheluwe is a Professor at the University of Antwerp (Belgium), and an Adjunct Professor at McGill University (Canada). He heads the Modelling, Simulation and Design (MSDL) research lab distributed over both locations. He has a long-standing interest in the DEVS formalism and has contributed fundamental and technical research results to the DEVS community. In a variety of projects, often with industrial partners, he develops and applies the model-based theory and techniques of Multi-Paradigm Modelling (MPM). His current interests are in domain-specific modelling and simulation, including the development of graphical user interfaces for multiple platforms. He is co-founder and chair of the European COST Action IC1404 “Multi-Paradigm Modelling for Cyber-Physical Systems” (MPM4CPS).


[T5] Developing Reactive Systems with Statecharts

Speakers: Simon Van Mierlo and Hans Vangheluwe

Abstract

Statecharts, introduced by David Harel in 1987, is a formalism used to specify the behaviour of timed, autonomous and reactive systems using a discrete-event abstraction. It is an extension of Timed Finite State Automata which adds depth, orthogonality, broadcast communication and history. Its visual representation is based on higraphs, which combine graphs and Venn diagrams. Many tools offer visual editing, simulation and code synthesis support for the Statecharts formalism. Examples include STATEMATE, Rhapsody, Yakindu, and Stateflow, each implementing different variants of Harel’s original Semantics. This tutorial introduces Statecharts modelling, simulation, and testing. As a running example, the behaviour of a traffic light, a simple timed, autonomous and reactive system is modelled. We start from the basic concepts of states and transitions and explain the more advanced concepts of Statecharts by extending the example incrementally. We discuss several semantics variants, such as STATEMATE and Rhapsody. We use Yakindu to model the example system.

Length: half day

Biography

Simon Van Mierlo is a post-doctoral researcher at the University of Antwerp (Belgium). He is a member of the Modelling, Simulation and Design (MSDL) research lab. For his PhD thesis, he developed debugging techniques for modelling and simulation formalisms by explicitly modelling their executor’s control flow using Statecharts. He is the main developer and maintainer of SCCD https://msdl.uantwerpen.be/documentation/SCCD/, a hybrid formalism that combines Statecharts with Class Diagrams.

Hans Vangheluwe is a Professor at the University of Antwerp (Belgium), and an Adjunct Professor at McGill University (Canada). He heads the Modelling, Simulation and Design (MSDL) research lab distributed over both locations. In a variety of projects, often with industrial partners, he develops and applies the model-based theory and techniques of Multi-Paradigm Modelling (MPM). His current interests are in domain-specific modelling and simulation, including the development of graphical user interfaces for multiple platforms. To model such reactive systems, he advocates the use of Statecharts to describe their behaviour. He is co-founder and chair of the European COST Action IC1404 “Multi-Paradigm Modelling for Cyber-Physical Systems” (MPM4CPS).


[T6] Exploring Decision Space using Actor based Simulation - a Model Based Approach

Speakers: Vinay Kulkarni, Tony Clark, Souvik Barat and Balbir Barn

Abstract

Large complex systems such as modern enterprises typically exhibit a system of systems character. As a result, it is difficult to have an understanding of the overall system behaviour through decomposition in a top-down manner. Inherent uncertainty and fragmented information further exacerbate the task. Instead, we propose a bottom-up approach wherein the fragmented localized behaviours are captured using Actor abstraction and these micro-behaviours are simulated leading to the emergent macro-behaviour which is then analyzed using pattern-matching techniques. Ramifications of changing micro-behaviours onto the macro-behaviour can be observed using simulation thus providing an aid for exploring decision space of a large complex system. We introduce a new technology that supports decision space exploration using Actor based simulation and illustrate how it is applied to real life problems using real world case studies.

Length: half day

Biography

Tony Clark is Professor of Software Engineering at Sheffield Hallam University in the UK. His academic research on meta- modelling led to the development of a tool called XModeler that has been used in a number of commercial applications including the development of tool support for a new Enterprise Architecture modeling language.

Vinay Kulkarni is Chief Scientist at Tata Consultancy Services Research (TCSR). His research interests include model-driven software engineering, self-adaptive systems, and enterprise modeling. His work in model-driven software engineering has led to a toolset that has been used to deliver several large business-critical systems over the past 20 years. Much of this work has found a way into OMG standards. Vinay also serves as Visiting Professor at Middlesex University London.

Souvik Barat is a Senior Scientist at Tata Consultancy Services Research (TCSR). His research interests include model-driven software engineering and enterprise modeling.

Balbir Barn is Professor of Software Engineering at Middlesex University London with extensive experience in industrial Software Engineering including the design and implementation of the IEF.


[T7] Managing the Co-Evolution of Domain-Specific Languages and Models

Speakers: Juha-Pekka Tolvanen and Steven Kelly

Abstract

Refinement, enhancement and other maintenance tasks normally account for more work than the initial development phase. This applies to domain-specific languages and models, too. This tutorial describes practices for managing the evolution of domain-specific modelling languages, while co-evolving the models that have already been created. The presented practices are field-tested in industry cases – some managed and refined over three decades. Participants will learn practices and patterns to form part of their toolbox for evolving their languages while in use alongside models. During the tutorial the practices learned are made concrete by applying them to sample cases.

Length: half day

Biography

Juha-Pekka Tolvanen is the CEO of MetaCase and co-founder of the DSM Forum. He has been involved in model-driven development and tools, notably metamodeling and code generators, since 1991. He has acted as a consultant world-wide for modeling language development, authored a book on Domain-Specific Modeling, and written over 70 articles for various software development magazines and conferences. Juha-Pekka holds a Ph.D. in computer science and he is an adjunct professor (docent on software development methods) at the University of Jyväskylä.

Steven Kelly is the CTO of MetaCase and co-founder of the DSM Forum. He has over twenty years of experience of consulting and building tools for Domain-Specific Modeling. Steven acts as an architect and lead developer of MetaEdit+, MetaCase’s domain-specific modeling tool, he has seen it win or be a finalist in awards from SD Times, Byte, the Innosuomi prize for innovation awarded by the Finnish President. He is author of a book and over 50 articles. Steven has an M.A. (Hons.) in Mathematics and Computer Science from University of Cambridge, and a Ph.D. from the University of Jyväskylä.


[T8] ThingML: Model-Driven Software Engineering for Heterogeneous and Distributed Reactive Systems

Speakers: Franck Fleurey, Brice Morin, Jakob Høgenes and Nicolas Ferry

Abstract

A Cyber Physical Systems (CPS) typically relies on a highly heterogeneous interconnection of platforms and devices offering a diversity of complementary capabilities: from cloud server with their virtually unlimited resources to tiny microcontrollers supporting the connection to the physical world. This tutorial presents a tool supported Model-Driven Software Engineering (MDSE) approach targeting the heterogeneity and distribution challenges associated with the development of CPS. The approach is based on a domain specific modelling languages called ThingML. The foundations and rational of ThingML have been elaborated over the past years based on a set of experiences and projects aiming applying the state of the art in MDSE in practical contexts and with different industry partners. The aim of the tutorial is (i) to reflect on these experiences to motivate the approach and its implementation, (ii) to describe the approach and its usage by the actors involved in the development of CPS and (iii) to provide handson experience with the associated tools.

Length: half day

Biography

Franck Fleurey is a senior IoT Developer at Tellu IoT, Asker, Norway. He received a PhD degree in Computer Science from the University of Rennes 1 (France) in 2006. One contribution of his thesis was the Kermeta meta-modeling language and framework. His research interests include model-driven software engineering, embedded systems, product lines, adaptive systems and software validation. He has been active in the MODELS community for more than 10 years and has had a focus on developing and using MDE approaches in both academic and industry-driven projects. He is the author of more than 90 peer-reviewed publications totaling over 4700 citations.

Brice Morin is a senior research scientist at SINTEF Digital in Oslo, Norway. He holds a PhD degree in Computer Science from the University of Rennes, France. One contribution of his thesis was the models@runtime paradigm, which he pioneered together with his colleagues in the EU project DiVA. His research focuses on investigating sound and practical modeling foundations for heterogeneous and distributed software systems (ranging from the cloud to the Internet of Things). He has been active in the MODELS community for more than 10 years, including 9 accepted papers. Since 2007, Brice published more than 60 peer-reviewed papers totaling more than 1900 citations, including 10 papers at MODELS.

Jakob Høgenes is a research scientist at SINTEF Digital in Oslo, Norway. He holds a MSc degree in Engineering Cybernetics from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology. His research focuses on applying tools and methods from dynamical systems and control theory to complex and distributed software systems, currently addressing security in the IoT domain. Jakob will not present at the tutorial.

Nicolas Ferry is a research scientist at SINTEF Digital (Norway). He holds a PhD degree from the University of Nice and is interested in the application of model-driven techniques for the design and operation of dynamically adaptive systems, in particular applied to the IoT and Cloud Computing domains. His main research topics includes model-driven engineering, domain-specific languages, Internet of Things, cloud-computing, self-adaptive systems, and dynamically adaptive systems. He has been involved in several national and international projects and is currently the technical manager of the ENACT H2020 EU Project. He has been member of program committees of several international conferences and workshops such as the UIC conference series and the CloudWays workshops. Nicolas will not present at the tutorial.


[T9] RobMoSys: Better Models, Tools and Software for Robotic Systems](http://www.servicerobotik-ulm.de/models2018/)

Speakers: Christian Schlegel and Herman Bruyninckx

Abstract

The EU H2020 RobMoSys Project (http://robmosys.eu) aims to coordinate the whole robotics community’s best and consorted effort to realize a step change towards a European ecosystem for open and industry-grade model-driven software development for robotics. This tutorial introduces the principles and model-driven approaches for robotics envisioned in RobMoSys. It explains by the means of an Eclipse-based tooling how the modeling principles become accessible to different roles like component suppliers, system builders, experts for task plots, and others and how models are being transformed into composable software artefacts. A major goal of this tutorial is to give RobMoSys exposition in the “generic” MDE community and attract more researchers towards robotics problems. This is also about explicating the special needs of robotics and discussing these with the MDE community.

Length: half day

Biography

Christian Schlegel is the technical Lead of the H2020 RobMoSys project. Elected coordinator of the euRobotics Topic Group on Software Engineering, System Integration, System Engineering. Co-Founder and Associate Editor of the open access journal JOSER – Journal of Software Engineering for Robotics. Co-Organizer of the series of International Workshop on Domain-Specific Languages and Models for Robotics Systems (DSLRob). Head of the service robotics research group at Hochschule Ulm, Professor for Real Time Systems and Autonomous Systems in the Computer Science Department of Hochschule Ulm since 2004. Co-opted member of the Faculty of Engineering, Computer Science and Psychology of the University of Ulm.

Herman Bruyninckx is a Core Technical Partner of the H2020 RobMoSys project with a focus on modeling of motion, perception and world model stacks for robotics. Associate Editor of the open access journal JOSER – Journal of Software Engineering for Robotics. From 2008 to 2015, he has been leading the robotics community in Europe, first as Coordinator of the seminal network EURON, and in 2013-2015 as Vice-President Research of the euRobotics association. Full professor at KU Leuven and part-time at Eindhoven University of Technology.


[T10] How to Build Domain Specific Modeling Languages and Interpreters with WebGME – an Online, Collaborative Metamodeling Environment

Speaker: Patrik Meijer

Abstract

WebGME (Generic Modeling Environment) is a web-based, online, collaborative metamodeling environment maintained by Vanderbilt University available as open source under the MIT licence. WebGME supports the design of Domain Specific Modeling Languages (DSML) and the creation of corresponding domain models. The main design drivers have been scalability, extensibility and version control. WebGME provides a variety of extension points to customize the application and build up Design Studios suiting articular needs. These extensions include: plugins/interpreters, decorators, visualizers, server routers, webhooks, layouts etc. These can be neatly generated, shared and imported using a command line interface, webgme-cli. After an initial introduction, the first part of the tutorial will focus on how to define and construct a metamodel for a specific domain using the bundled GUI running inside a browser. As the metamodel progresses a domain model will be built up in parallel, highlighting the way WebGME fuses the aspects of metamodeling and modeling. In the second part, a model interpreter for code generation will be written using an integrated code editor inside of the WebGME GUI. In the final part an outline of how a fully customized WebGME Design Studio can be built up will be presented.

Length: half day

Biography

Patrik Meijer is a Senior Research Engineer at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, TN. He is currently one of the core developers of the WebGME framework and has taught and demonstrated WebGME at numerous occasions. He earned his MSc degree in Engineering Mathematics from Lund University, Sweden, in 2012 and has since worked for Vanderbilt University in the area of Model Integrated Computing.

Tamas Kecskes is a Senior Research Engineer at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, TN. He took part in the architectural design of WebGME and has been a core developer of the framework since. He earned his university diploma in 2003 from the University of Szeged, Hungary. He worked as a Software Engineer - and later as a Senior Software Engineer and Product Architect - at Nokia Ltd. for 8 years. He joined Vanderbilt University in 2012 where he started his PhD studies in 2014. He held product trainings for software engineers at Nokia and also participated in teaching courses in Model Integrated Computing at Vanderbilt.


[T11] Seamless Model-Based Systems Engineering: The SPES Approach

Speakers: Andreas Vogelsang, Wolfgang Böhm, Sebastian Voss and Ilias Gerostathopoulos

Abstract

Cyber-physical systems are based on networked embedded software systems, which connect computational entities in a collaborative manner with physical entities of the real world to achieve an overall purpose for its users. Together with available content and services from the Internet, they build networks of collaborating systems that integrate (monitor, coordinate, control) with the physical environment. Mastering the engineering of complex and trustworthy CPS poses serious challenges, which have to be addressed by the engineering methodologies of the future. The SPES methodology is a development methodology for cyber-physical systems, which has been developed for more than six years by over 20 partners from academia and industry. Meanwhile, the methodology has been adopted by several companies in Germany. The core of the SPES methodology is a modeling framework, which comprises the fundamental modeling concepts that are needed, including relationships between models such as refinement, and ways to define mappings between modeling concepts. The SPES modeling framework categorizes these artifacts into four viewpoints and allows specifying artifacts on a dynamic model of layers of abstraction. This tutorial provides an overview of the SPES modeling framework as well as hands-on exercises and demos in the tool AutoFocus3.

Length: half day

Biography

Andreas Vogelsang is professor for automotive software engineering at the Daimler Center for Automotive IT Innovations at the Technical University of Berlin. He received his PhD from the Technical University of Munich in 2015. His research interests comprise model-based requirements engineering and software architectures for embedded systems. He participated in several research collaborations with industrial partners especially from the automotive industry. He has published multiple papers at RE, MODELS, ICSE, and REFSQ.

Wolfgang Böhm is a senior research fellow at the software & systems engineering research group at the Technical University of Munich. He holds a PhD in mathematics and gained 25 years of professional experience in the IT and communication industry. After joining the research group, he led the BMBF research projects SPES2020 and SPES XT. Model-based development is his main research interest.

Sebastian Voss has done his PhD in the avionic context at Airbus in the Sensors, Electronics & Systems Integration department. Previously, he worked at Daimler research & development. At fortiss, he is heading the Model-based Systems Engineering department and the Embedded Systems Software Engineering Institute (ESSEI). His research interests include techniques and tools for the professional development of collaborative software-intensive systems using model-based methodology, efficient design space exploration methods and their model-based tooling. He has a lectureship at the TU Munich from the department of informatics for various lectures incl. Modelling Distributed Systems.

Ilias Gerostathopoulos is a postdoctoral researcher at the Technical University of Munich in the Software & Systems Engineering Research Group. He obtained a PhD in Computer Science from the Department of Distributed and Dependable Systems, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University in Prague. His main research interests are software architecture, self-adaptive systems, and big data analytics.


[T12] ML + FV = ♥! A Gentle Introduction to the Application of Machine Learning to Formal Verification

Speakers: Moussa Amrani, Levi Lúcio, Adrien Bibal

Abstract

Formal Verification (FV) and Machine Learning (ML) can seem incompatible due to their opposite mathematical foundations and their use in real-life problems: FV mostly relies on discrete mathematics and aims at ensuring correctness; ML often relies on probabilistic models and consists of learning patterns from training data. In this tutorial, we will explore how ML helps FV in some classical approaches: static analysis, theorem-proving, and SAT solving. We draw a landscape of the current practice and demonstrate with practical examples from state-of-the-art tools some of the most prominent uses of ML in FV, thus offering a new perspective on FV techniques that can help researchers and practitioners to better locate potential synergies. We will discuss lessons learned from a survey we have done during the past year, point to possible improvements and offer visions for the future of the domain in the light of the science of software and systems modelling. The tutorial will be interactive in the sense that we will hold discussions with the audience in order to both challenge the views we present throughout the tutorial and gather directions for future research on this topic.

Length: half day

Biography

Moussa Amrani is a post-doc researcher at Université de Namur, Belgium. He graduated with a Ph.D from the University of Luxembourg in 2013 for his work on the formal verification of model transformation languages. In Namur, he works with local industries to help them introduce Model-Driven Software Engineering and Domain-Specific Languages in their development processes, and ensure the correctness of their software through testing and formal verification tools. He is currently involved in a Walloon Region project aiming at certifying applications (for aeronautics DO-178C; for trains EN 50155 and EN 5012x). Moussa’s current research interests include software modeling, formal verification, and software certification.

Levi Lúcio is a senior scientist and project manager at fortiss GmbH in Munich, Germany. He was awarded a PhD from the University of Geneva, Switzerland, in 2008, for his work on Model-Based Testing. At fortiss he works with aerospace and automotive companies to develop novel tools that include model-based software engineering and domain specificity at their core. After completing his PhD, Levi worked extensively in the area of model transformations, having proposed techniques for model transformation specification, execution and verification, as well as surveys in the domain. He has been part of the organizing committee of 10+ workshops, many of them co-located with MODELS. Levi’s current research interests are domain-specific modeling, usability in formal methods and, more recently, how machine learning can help in modeling software and in software engineering in general.

Adrien Bibal is a Ph.D. student at the Université de Namur (Belgium) under the supervision of Professor Benoît Frénay. He received an M.S. degree in Computer Science and an M.A. degree in Philosophy from the Université catholique de Louvain (Belgium) in 2013 and 2015 respectively. His Ph.D. thesis in Machine Learning is on the interpretability of dimensionality reduction models.